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Home > For the Media Home > Biosketches > By Topic > Employment-Based Coverage

Biosketches - Employment-Based Coverage

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Employment-Based Coverage research examines issues at the core of the health insurance coverage debate, addressing such topics as the impact of the macroeconomy, premium, and subsidies on coverage.
 
Abraham, Jean Marie
Baughman, Reagan
Bhattacharya, Jay
Blumberg, Linda J.
Buchmueller, Thomas
Bundorf, M. Kate
Cancian, Maria
Cawley, John
Chernew, Michael
Dey, Matthew
Dushi, Irena
Ellis, Randall
Escarce, Jose J.
Flinn, Christopher
Garrett, Bowen
Gruber, Jonathan
Hirth, Richard
Honig, Marjorie
Kapur, Kanika
Keenan, Patricia
Kreider, Brent
Kuttner, Hanns
Lang, Kevin
Lo Sasso, Anthony T.
Ma, Ching-to Albert
Marquis, Susan
Maxwell, Nan L.
McKnight, Robin
McLaughlin, Catherine
Monheit, Alan C.
Nichols, Len
Paringer, Lynn
Pauly, Mark V.
Royalty, Anne
Senesky Dolfin, Sarah.
Shelton, Emily
Simon, Kosali
Swartz, Katherine
Vistnes, Jessica
Washington, Ebonya

JEAN MARIE ABRAHAM, PH.D.
Jean Marie Abraham is currently an Assistant Professor of Health Economics in the Department of Healthcare Management at the University of Minnesota . Her research interests include household decision-making regarding employer-based health insurance, the impact of health insurance on labor market outcomes, consumer use of information in health care decisions, and competition in the markets for health care coverage and hospital services. In 2001, she received her Ph.D. from the H. John Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management at Carnegie Mellon University. Prior to pursuing her graduate studies, she had internships with the Office of U.S. Senator John McCain and the Antitrust Division of the U.S. Department of Justice.

REAGAN BAUGHMAN, PH.D.
Reagan Baughman is Assistant Professor of Economics at the University of New Hampshire. She received her bachelor's degree summa cum laude from Drew University in Madison, NJ in 1996 and her Ph.D. in Economics from Syracuse University in 2001. From 2001 to 2003 she was a research fellow in the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Scholars in Health Policy Research Program at the University of Michigan. Her research interests include the effectiveness of tax subsidies to employer-provided health insurance for lower-skill workers, the impact of Medicaid and SCHIP expansions on coverage patterns for children and the labor market for nursing and home health aides.

JAY BHATTACHARYA, M.D., PH.D.
Jay Bhattacharya is an assistant professor of medicine at Stanford University. Jay finished his M.D. in 1997 and was awarded his Ph.D. in 2000 on the subject of physician wages in the United States. Bhattacharya's research interests can best be summarized as the microeconometric analysis of health and health care for special populations. He has published empirical economics and health services research papers on the elderly, on adolescents, on HIV patients, on the disabled, on injured workers, and on managed care experts. Most recently, he has done work on the regulation of viatical settlements market, which is a secondary life insurance market popular among HIV patients, and on summer-winter differences in nutritional outcomes for poor American families.

LINDA J. BLUMBERG, PH.D.
Linda J. Blumberg, Ph.D. is an economist and senior research associate at the Urban Institute. She is currently working on a variety of projects related to private health insurance and health care financing. Her recent work includes: an analysis of the private and public cost impacts of government reinsurance programs; a decomposition of the sources of the decline in employer-sponsored insurance over the last recession; and an analysis of recent changes in the health insurance coverage of the middle class. She has estimated the coverage and risk pool impacts of tax credit proposals and public insurance expansions, estimated price elasticities of employers offering and workers taking-up health insurance, and analyzed the effects of insurance market reforms on the risk pool of the privately insured. She is also the principal investigator in the development and use of the Urban Institute's Health Insurance Reform Simulation Model (HIRSM). From August 1993 through October 1994 Dr. Blumberg served as health policy advisor to the Clinton Administration during its initial health care reform effort.

THOMAS BUCHMUELLER, PH.D.
Thomas Buchmueller is Professor of Economics and Public Policy and Director of the Center for Health Care Management and Policy at the University of California Irvine's Paul Merage School of Business. Professor Buchmueller is also an affiliate of UCI's Center for Health Policy Research and a Faculty Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. He is a Deputy Editor of Medical Care, Co-Editor of the Journal of Economics and Management Strategy and is on the Editorial Board of Inquiry.

Professor Buchmueller is a health economist whose main research interests involve the economics of private and public health insurance. He has done considerable research on the economics of managed competition, including several studies on the effect of prices on the health plan choices of consumers. He has also published several studies on the effect of employer-provided health insurance on the labor market decisions of workers and employers, the regulation of private health insurance, and the effects of public insurance expansions on public and private coverage.

M. KATE BUNDORF, PH.D.
Kate Bundorf is an Assistant Professor of Health Research and Policy at Stanford University School of Medicine She received her Ph.D. from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania in 2000 and her MBA and MPH degrees from the University of California at Berkeley in 1996. Her research interests are in the general areas of health economics and health insurance markets. She is currently working on projects examining risk selection in health insurance markets, the effects of health insurance mandates, and the impact of health plan report cards on quality of care.

MARIA CANCIAN, PH.D.
Maria Cancian is Professor of Social Work and Public Affairs, an affiliate of the Center for Demography and Ecology, and Director of the Institute for Research on Poverty. Her research is in the area of domestic social policy. Her recent research considers the impact of married women's growing employment and earnings on marriage patterns and the inter- and intra-household distribution of income, the work and income of women who have received welfare, and the implications of child support and custody for the well-being of divorced and never-married families. Since 1997 she has been Principal Investigator, with Daniel R. Meyer, of the Child Support Demonstration Evaluation, which evaluates child-support policy implemented as part of welfare reform in Wisconsin.

Professor Cancian has been a visiting scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation and a visiting fellow at the Public Policy Institute of California. She is Secretary of the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management. Her articles have appeared in journals including Demography, Journal of Marriage and the Family, Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, Review of Economics and Statistics and Social Service Review . She received her doctorate in economics from the University of Michigan.

JOHN CAWLEY, PH.D.
John Cawley is an associate professor in the Department of Policy Analysis and Management at Cornell University. He earned a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago and was a Robert Wood Johnson Scholar in Health Policy Research at the University of Michigan from 1999-2001. His primary field of research is health economics; his research on insurance has been published in the American Economic Review, Journal of Health Economics, and Frontiers in Health Policy Research. John has served on advisory committees and expert panels for the Institute of Medicine, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Food and Drug Administration. He is an associate editor of the journal Economics and Human Biology, and in 2005 was awarded the John D. Thompson Prize for Young Investigators in health services research.

MICHAEL CHERNEW, PH.D.
Dr. Chernew is Professor at the University of Michigan in the department of Health Management and Policy. He also has appointments in the departments of Internal Medicine, and Economics. He received a Ph.D. in economics from Stanford University, where his training focused on areas of applied microeconomics and econometrics. Dr. Chernew is Co-Editor of the American Journal of Managed Care and Co-Director of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Scholars in Health Policy Research program at the University of Michigan. One major area of Dr. Chernew's research focuses on assessing the impact of managed care on the health care marketplace, with an emphasis on examining the impact of managed care on health care cost growth and on the use of medical technology. In 2000 and 2004, he served on technical advisory panels for the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) that reviewed the assumptions used by the Medicare actuaries to assess the financial status of the Medicare trust funds. On the panels Dr. Chernew focused on the methodology used to project trends in long term health care cost growth. Other research has examined determinants of patient choice of hospital and the impact of health plan performance measures on employee and employer selection of health plans. In 1998, he was awarded the John D. Thompson Prize for Young investigators by the Association of University Programs in Public Health. In 1999, he received the Alice S. Hersh, Young Investigator Award from the Association of Health Services Research. Both of these awards recognize overall contribution to the field of health services research. Dr. Chernew is a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research and he is on the Editorial Boards of Health Services Research, Health Affairs, and Medical Care Research and Review.

MATTHEW DEY, PH.D.
Matthew Dey received his PhD from New York University in May 2001 after completing his dissertation entitled "Employer-Provided Health Insurance: Mobility, Efficiency, and Labor Market Equilibrium." He joined the University of Chicago faculty in August of 2000.

IRENA DUSHI, PH.D.
Irena Dushi, Ph.D., is a Research Analyst at the International Longevity Center-USA. She earned her Ph.D. in economics from the Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education (CERGE) in Prague (Czech Republic) in 1998 funded by the Soros Foundation. Prior to joining the ILC in 1999, she held a research fellowship position at the Institute of Advanced Studies in Vienna (under a European Union fellowship program) and an exchange fellowship at the City University of New York. She has taught several courses in the Economics Department at Hunter College in New York.

Dr. Dushi is a labor economist with research interests in the economics of aging and health insurance. Since joining ILC, her work has been supported by the U.S. Department of Labor, Pension and Welfare Benefits Administration, Boston College's Steven H. Sandell Grant Program for Junior Scholars in Retirement Research, University of Michigan's Economic Research Initiative on the Uninsured (ERIU), and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Health Care Financing and Organization (HCF) Initiative. Her current work focuses on employment-related health insurance demand by dual-earner households, disparities in the use of health services and health outcomes before and after the age of Medicare eligibility, and the demand for annuities. She has published work on the demand for health insurance in the American Economic Review Papers and Proceedings, and on the design of employee benefits in a book entitled Benefits for the Workplace of the Future, edited by Olivia Mitchell et al., and published by the Pension Research Council.

RANDALL ELLIS, PH.D
Randall Ellis is a Professor of Economics at Boston University where he has been on the faculty since 1981. He is currently a director of the International Health Economics Association and the American Society of Health Economists, as well as an associate editor of the Journal of Health Economics. Professor Ellis is best known for his work on provider, and health plan payment incentives, particularly on how payments affect consumer, provider and health plan decisions. He is one of the co-developers of the Diagnostic Cost Group risk adjustment model currently being used for the U.S. Medicare program to capitate managed care plans.

JOSE J. ESCARCE, PH.D
Josť J. Escarce, M.D., Ph.D., is Professor of Medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and Senior Natural Scientist at RAND. Dr. Escarce graduated from Princeton University, earned a Master's degree in Physics from Harvard University and obtained his medical degree and doctorate in health economics from the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Escarce has served on the National Advisory Council for Health Care Policy, Research, and Evaluation of the Department of Health and Human Services and the National Advisory Committees of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Minority Medical Faculty Development Program. He is past Chair of the Health Economics Committee of the American Public Health Association, and has served on numerous Institute of Medicine and National Research Council committees and panels. He was Deputy Editor of the journal Medical Care and is currently Senior Associate Editor of Health Services Research. Dr. Escarce's research interests include provider and patient behavior under economic incentives, access to care, racial and ethnic disparities in health and health care, and immigrant health, and the impact of managed care on cost and quality.

CHRISTOPHER FLINN, PH.D.
Christopher Flinn is Professor of Economics at New York University, a Coeditor of the Journal of Human Resources, and an Associate Editor of the European Economic Review and the Review of Economics of the Household . He is a Research Affiliate of the Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, a Research Fellow of IZA (Bonn), a member of the Scientific Committee of CHILD at the University of Torino, and has recently been elected as President of the European Society for Population Economics (ESPE). He earned his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago after studying demography at the University of Michigan, and has previously taught at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His research interests include labor market dynamics (especially job mobility) and intrahousehold bargaining. He is currently completing a monograph on theoretical and empirical approaches to assessing the impact of the minimum wage on labor market outcomes for the Upjohn Institute for Employment Research. Other projects in progress include research on the relationship between child outcomes and the marital status of parents (with Meta Brown), the construction and estimation of a model of intrahousehold bargaining and labor market search (with Matt Dey), and the estimation of a model of household labor supply with an endogenous decision of whether to behave cooperatively (with Daniela Del Boca).

BOWEN GARRETT, PH.D
Dr. Bowen Garrett is a Senior Research Associate in the Health Policy Center at the Urban Institute in Washington, D.C. He is currently leading research projects on the effects of recession on insurance coverage, racial and ethnic disparities in health care access and utilization, and Medicare's new prospective payment system for inpatient psychiatric facilities. He is also working with a team of researchers on ways to improve Medicare's prospective payment system for skilled nursing home facilities. His recent publications examined the health insurance coverage implications of leaving welfare, the effects of Medicaid managed care on health services access and use, the effects of welfare policies and economic factors on Medicaid caseloads, and policy interactions between the Supplemental Security Income and Aid to Families with Dependent Children programs.

Before joining the Urban Institute in 1998, Dr. Garrett was a post-doctoral research fellow in the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Scholars in Health Policy Research Program at the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Garrett obtained his Ph.D. in 1996 from the Department of Economics at Columbia University, with specializations in econometrics and labor economics.

JONATHAN GRUBER, PH.D.
Dr. Jonathan Gruber is a Professor of Economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he has taught since 1992. He is also the Director of the Program on Children at the National Bureau of Economic Research, where he is a Research Associate. He is a co-editor of the Journal of Public Economics , and an Associate Editor of the Journal of Health Economics.

Dr. Gruber received his B.S. in Economics from MIT, and his Ph.D. in Economics from Harvard. He has received an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Research Fellowship, a FIRST award from the National Institute on Aging, and the Kenneth Arrow Award for the Best Paper in Health Economics in 1994. He was also one of 15 scientists nationwide to receive the Presidential Faculty Fellow Award from the National Science Foundation in 1995. During the 1997-1998 academic year, Dr. Gruber was on leave as Deputy Assistant Secretary for Economic Policy at the Treasury Department.

Dr. Gruber's research focuses on the areas of public finance and health economics. His recent areas of particular interest include the economics of employer provided health insurance, the efficiency of our current system of delivering health care to the indigent, the effect of the Social Security program on retirement behavior, and the economics of smoking.

RICHARD HIRTH, PH.D.
Dr. Richard Hirth is Associate Professor of Health Management and Policy, and Chairman of the Health Services Organization and Policy (HSOP) Doctoral Program. He received his Bachelor's degree in Economics from Carleton College, and Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Pennsylvania.

Dr. Hirth has received several research awards, including the Kenneth J. Arrow Award in Health Economics, awarded annually by the American Public Health Association and the International Health Economics Association to the best paper in health economics (1993); the Excellence in Research Award in Health Policy from the Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Michigan Foundation (1998); and the Thompson Prize for Young Investigtors from the Association of University Programs in health Administration (1999).

MARJORIE HONIG, PH.D.
Marjorie Honig is Professor of Economics at Hunter College and the Graduate School of the City University of New York. Her research interests include worker and household decisions regarding employer-based health insurance and other non-wage compensation, the effects of Social Security and private pensions on labor supply, the evaluation of retirement wealth, and retirement expectations and realizations. She is a member of the National Academy of Social Insurance, the Board of Outside Scholars of the Michigan Retirement Research Center, and co-editor of the Social Insurance Research Network on Social Security, Pensions and Retirement Income.

KANIKA KAPUR, PH.D.
Kanika Kapur is an economist with RAND in Santa Monica, California. She received her Ph.D. in 1997 from Northwestern University and her B.A. in 1992 from Dartmouth College. Her research interests span several areas of health and labor economics. She has authored several studies that examine the labor market implications of employer provided health insurance. She has also studied the role of individual health insurance market in reaching the uninsured. In other work, she has examined the determinants of health expenditures, including the importance of health plan structure and the role of socio-economic and racial characteristics.

PATRICIA KEENAN, PH.D.
Patricia Seliger Keenan is a postdoctoral fellow in Aging and Health Economics at the National Bureau of Economic Research. Next year, she will be an assistant professor at the Yale School of Public Health. She received a PhD in Health Policy from Harvard University in 2005. Her research focuses on health insurance markets, aging policy, and health care regulation and politics.

BRENT KREIDER, PH.D.
Brent Kreider (Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison) is an associate professor of economics at Iowa State University . His fields of specialization include public economics, applied econometrics, labor economics, and health economics. Recent empirical work develops methods for improving inferences about relationships between public policy and outcome measures of interest such as labor supply, program participation, and health care utilization among the disabled and other low-income groups. Part of this research investigates what can be learned in the presence of non-classical measurement error in key variables, such as disability or health insurance status. Although primarily an applied economist, he has also written theoretical articles on optimal taxation, tax incidence, income uncertainty, and human capital accumulation.

HANNS KUTTNER, M.A.
As Senior Research Associate at The Economic Research Initiative on the Uninsured (ERIU) at the University of Michigan, Mr. Kuttner is responsible for liaison with policy audiences and works on translating research results for general audiences.

Prior to joining ERIU at its inception in 2001, Mr. Kuttner was the founding policy director of the Josiah Bartlett Center for Public Policy, a research organization focused on New Hampshire issues. He also served as a staff member for the Illinois Governor's Task Force on Human Services Reform and the District of Columbia Tax Revision Commission.

Mr. Kuttner also worked at the Department of Health and Human Services' congressional liaison office as special assistant to the administrator of the Health Care Financing Administration, now known as the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. During the first Bush Administration, he served as a member of the White House policy staff, responsible for health and social issues.

Mr. Kuttner received his MA from the University of Chicago's Irving B. Harris Graduate School of Public Policy Studies.

KEVIN LANG, PH.D.
Kevin Lang received his BA in Philosophy, Politics and Economics (PPE) from Oxford University, his MSc in economics from the University of Montreal, and his PhD in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is presently a professor and chair of the department of economics at Boston University. He serves as co-editor of Labour Economics, the journal of the European Association of Labor Economists. He spent a year at the National Bureau of Economic Research (where he is presently a Research Associate) on a prestigious Olin Foundation Fellowship and three months at the New Zealand Institute of Economic Research on a Fullbright Fellowship. He was the recipient of an Sloan Foundation Faculty Research Fellowship. Dr. Lang's research has been funded by several grants from the National Science Foundation. His research focuses on the economics of labor markets and education, including such topics as discrimination, unemployment, the relation between education and earnings and the relation between housing prices, taxes and local services. In addition to publishing widely in leading academic journals, Dr. Lang maintains an active role in public affairs. He was a member of the Advisory Board of the Canadian Employment Research Forum. In his home town of Brookline, Massachusetts, he serves as chair of the elected school board.

ANTHONY T. LO SASSO, PH.D.
Anthony T. Lo Sasso, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor and Senior Research Scientist in the Health Policy and Administration Division at the School of Public Health at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Dr. Lo Sasso is an economist and applied econometrician whose research spans several dimensions of health and labor economics and health services research. He received his doctorate in economics in 1996 from Indiana University, Bloomington. He is currently in the final year of a 5-year Independent Scientist Award from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality studying workplace health benefits and how they affect employee health. As part of this broad research agenda, Dr. Lo Sasso has recently completed a study funded by the National Institute of Mental Health to examine the impact of an expansion of mental health benefits on cost and quality of care at a Fortune 50 manufacturing firm. In addition, Dr. Lo Sasso is currently studying the nascent consumer-driven health care movement and its potential impact on employer-sponsored health insurance and employee health. Other recent research has examined the effect of copayment levels on the use of employer-provided substance abuse benefits. Additionally, he has explored the extent of so-called “responsible purchasing” by employers: the degree to which employers collect and use non-financial information in selecting and managing employee health care plans.

Dr. Lo Sasso is also keenly interested in how government policies affect private sector decisions. He has studied the impact of the State Children's Health Insurance Program on uninsurance among children and the extent to which public coverage may have “crowded out” private coverage of children. He currently has a grant to study how community rating provisions in state non-group health insurance markets affect non-group health insurance coverage and uninsurance. Dr. Lo Sasso also has recently completed a project funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Changes in Health Care Financing and Organization initiative to study how the availability of safety net health care services affects the willingness of firms to offer health insurance and the willingness of employees to take-up health insurance when it is offered.

CHING-TO ALBERT MA, PH.D.
Ching-to Albert Ma is professor of economics at Boston University, and the Director of the Industry Studies Program of the Boston University Economics Department. He is a coeditor of the Journal of Economics & Management Strategy, and an associate editor of the Rand Journal of Economics. Ma's research areas are in industrial organization, and health economics. His recent papers study dual-market job incentives, physician agency and asymmetric information, patient compliance and treatment progress, and selection in insurance and healthcare markets. In 1998, together with coauthor Thomas McGuire, Ma was awarded the Kenneth J. Arrow Award in Health Economics. He received a Ph.D. from the London School of Economics in 1988.

M. SUSAN MARQUIS, PH.D.
M. Susan Marquis (Ph.D., Economist, University of Michigan, 1978) is a Senior Economist at RAND in Washington, DC. She has over 30 years experience in analysis of health policy issues. Her research emphasizes policies to expand health insurance coverage and the effect of financing on access to health care. Dr. Marquis recently led a project to study the individual insurance market in California and explore how financial subsidies and other public policy might increase the role that market plays in covering the uninsured. She also recently completed a simulation study of the effects of California's pay or play employer mandate that was enacted in 2003 and subsequently narrowly overturned in referendum. She has led studies of the effect of state insurance market reforms, of Medicare beneficiary choices among alternative types of health plans, the demand for supplementary health insurance, and the effects of alternative financing policies on demand for private and public insurance. She has participated in designing and implementing evaluations of innovative financing arrangements and was a member of the RAND Health Insurance Experiment analysis team. She has served on advisory and technical panels for HCFA, the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research, the Physician Payment Review Commission, the National Institutes of Health, The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the Washington Business Group on Health. She has presented her research before academic and policy audiences, including testimony before the Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources. She received the NIHCM Sixth Annual Health Care Research Award in 1999.

NAN L. MAXWELL, PH.D.
Nan L. Maxwell is a Professor and Co-Chair of Economics and the Executive Director of the Human Investment Research and Education (HIRE) Center at California State University, Hayward. She received her Ph.D. in Economics from Florida State University in 1983 and was a visiting scholar at the Institute of Urban and Regional Development (for three years) and the National Center for Research in Vocational Education at the University of California, Berkeley and has held a visiting professor position at the Academy of National Economy (Moscow, Russia). Dr. Maxwell's research interest fall broadly within the field of labor economics. She is the author or co-author of papers published in leading economic and education journals, including Industrial and Labor Relations Review, Industrial Relations, Economic Inquiry, American Economic Review, Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, Economics of Education Review, Journal of Educational Research, Social Science Quarterly, Population Policy Review, American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Contemporary Policies Issues, and Social Forces. She has published two books, High School Career Academies: A Pathway to Educational Reform in Urban Schools? (published by the W.E. Upjohn Institute) and Income Inequality in the United States, 1947-1985 (published by Greenwood Press) and has a third, Moving on Up: Getting, Keeping and Moving from Low-Skilled Jobs, currently under review.

ROBIN MCKNIGHT, PH.D.
Robin McKnight is an assistant professor of economics at the University of Oregon and a faculty research fellow of the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER). Prior to joining the UO faculty in 2003, she earned a PhD in economics at MIT and held a post-doctoral fellowship in the economics of aging and health at the NBER. Her research interests span the fields of public economics and health economics, including issues that arise from government intervention in health insurance markets, such as through Medicare reimbursement policy.

CATHERINE MCLAUGHLIN, PH.D.
Dr. McLaughlin is a Professor in the Department of Health Management and Policy and the Director of the Economic Research Initiative on the Uninsured (ERIU) at the University of Michigan. ERIU, a five-year initiative funded by The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, has been conducting and disseminating research aimed at increasing our understanding of the interaction between health and labor market dynamics and the uninsured. In addition, Dr. McLaughlin is the director of the University of Michigan component of the Agency for Health Care Policy Research's Center of Excellence on Managed Care Markets and Quality directed by Harold Luft at University of California, San Francisco. The projects being pursued at Michigan focus on the dynamic interaction between plan performance measures, market structure, and employer behavior.

Dr. McLaughlin is also currently the Vice-Chair of the Citizens' Health Care Working Group and a Senior Associate Editor of Health Services Research. From 1993 to 2003 she was the Director of The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Scholars in Health Policy Research Program at Michigan. Her current research interests are focused on the uninsured, managed care, market competition, and employer and employee benefit choice.

Dr. McLaughlin has studied various health economics topics. She has published numerous articles on the impact of HMOs on market competition and health care costs, the determinants of small area variation in hospital utilization and costs, and issues surrounding the working uninsured. Recent publications include: “The Long-Term and Short-Term Effects of a Copayment Increase on the Utilization and Expenditures of Prescription Drugs,” in Inquiry, “Donated Care Programs: A Stopgap Measure or a Long-Run Alternative to Health Insurance?” in Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, “Quality and Employers' Choice of Health Plans,” in Journal of Health Economics, "Causes and Consequences of Lack of Health Insurance: Gaps in Our Knowledge," in Health Policy and the Uninsured , Urban Institute Press; "Who Walks Through the Door? The Effect of the Uninsured" in Health Affairs; "Medigap Premiums and Medicare HMO Enrollment" in Health Services Research; "The Who, What, and How of Managed Care," The Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law; "Health Care Consumers: Choices and Constraints" in Medical Care Research and Review, "Competition, Quality of Care, and The Role of Consumers," in The Milbank Quarterly, and "The Demand for Health Insurance Coverage by Low-Income Workers: Can Reduced Premiums Achieve Full Coverage?," in Health Services Research.

Professor McLaughlin received her Ph.D. in economics from the University of Wisconsin.

ALAN C. MONHEIT, PH.D.
Alan C. Monheit is Professor, School of Public Health, Department of Health Systems and Policy, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. He is also a Research Professor at the UMDNJ Center for Health Economics and Health Policy and at Rutgers University's Institute for Health, Health Care Policy, and Aging Research and its Center for State Health Policy. He has held research positions at the Boston University's Health Policy Institute and School of Medicine and was also Director of the Division of Social and Economic Research in the Center for Cost and Financing Studies, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Dr. Monheit's research interests include the relationship between employment and health insurance, health insurance dynamics, the uninsured population, the distribution of health care expenditures, regulation of health insurance markets, and children's access to health care. He is an editor and contributor to Informing American Health Care Policy: The Dynamics of Medical Expenditure and Insurance Surveys, 1987 - 1996 and State Insurance Market Reform: Toward Inclusive and Sustainable Health Insurance Markets. Dr. Monheit received the first Administrator's Award for Health Services Research from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and is a Fellow of the Employee Benefit Research Institute and a member of the National Academy of Social insurance.

LEN NICHOLS, PH.D.
Len Nichols is the Director of the Health Policy Program at the New America Foundation in Washington D.C. He is responsible for shaping the Foundation's approach to health care policy, focused on expanding health insurance coverage to all Americans while reigning in costs and improving the efficiency of the overall health care system. Prior to joining New America, Dr. Nichols was the Vice President of the Center for Studying Health Systems Change. He has also been a Principal Research Associate at The Urban Institute, and the Senior Advisor for Health Policy at the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) during the Clinton Health Reform efforts of 1993-1994. Prior to OMB, Dr. Nichols was a visiting Public Health Service Fellow at the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research during 1991-1992, and prior to that he was an Associate Professor and Economics Chair at Wellesley College, where he taught from 1980-1991. He received his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Illinois in 1980.

LYNN PARINGER, PH.D.
Dr. Lynn Paringer is a Professor of Economics and the Associate Director of the Human Investment in Research and Education (HIRE) Center at California State University, East Bay. She was a Fulbright Scholar at the Prague School of Economics, served as the Associate Dean of the School of Business and Economics at California State University, Hayward, and was a Research Associate at the Urban Institute (Washington D.C.). She is a nationally recognized expert in health economics with areas of emphasis including access to health insurance, economic cost of disease, HIV costs and testing, medical care utilization, the provision of employment based health insurance to disadvantaged workers, and employer responses to rising health care costs and the impact of case mix adjustments on health plan performance ratings. She has published in leading economic and health care journals including Health Affairs, Inquiry, Quarterly Review of Business and Economics, Health Care Financing Review, American Economic Review, Medical Care, Health Policy Education, and Public Health Reports.

Dr. Paringer received her doctorate in Economics from the University of Wisconsin.

MARK V. PAULY, PH.D.
Mark V. Pauly currently holds the position of Bendheim Professor in the Department of Health Care Systems at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. He received the Ph.D. in economics from the University of Virginia. He is Professor of Health Care Systems, Insurance and Risk Management and Business and Public Policy, at the Wharton School and Professor of Economics, in the School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Pauly is a former commissioner on the Physician Payment Review Commission and an active member of the Institute of Medicine. One of the nationís leading health economists, Dr. Pauly has made significant contributions to the fields of medical economics and health insurance. His classic study on the economics of moral hazard was the first to point out how health insurance coverage may affect patientsí use of medical services. Subsequent work, both theoretical and empirical, has explored the impact of conventional insurance coverage on preventive care, on outpatient care, and on prescription drug use in managed care. He is currently studying the effect of poor health on worker productivity. In addition, he has explored the influences that determine whether insurance coverage is available and, through several cost effectiveness studies, the influence of medical care and health practices on health outcomes and cost. His interests in health policy deal with ways to reduce the number of uninsured through tax credits for public and private insurance, and appropriate design for Medicare in a budget-constrained environment. Dr. Pauly is a co-editor-in-chief of the International Journal of Health Care Finance and Economics and an associate editor of the Journal of Risk and Uncertainty. He has served on Institute of Medicine panels on public accountability for health insurers under Medicare and on improving the supply of vaccines.

ANNE ROYALTY, Ph.D.
Anne Royalty is currently an Associate Professor of Economics at Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI). Prior to coming to IUPUI, she was an Assistant Professor of Economics at Stanford University. She received her Ph.D. in Economics from Yale University and her B.A. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Professor Royalty's current research focuses on employer-provided health insurance and other fringe benefits. Recent work includes analyses of price elasticities for employer-provided health insurance, estimation of workers' valuation of employer expenditures on health insurance benefits, and investigations of health insurance choices of two-earner households.

SARAH SENESKY DOLFIN, PH.D.
Sarah Senesky Dolfin is a researcher at Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. Her interests focus broadly on labor economics, including labor supply and the role of employers in determining hours of work. Her current work in the labor area involves examining the effect of overtime laws, measuring compliance with FLSA regulations, and evaluating the impact of the Trade Adjustment Assistance program on workers' wage and employment outcomes. Dolfin also pursues research on education and immigration, including evaluating the impact of high-intensity mentoring support for teachers on student and teacher outcomes, and analyzing the role played by networks in migration decisions.

Prior to her current position, Dolfin was an assistant professor of economics at the University of California, Irvine. She received a Ph.D. in economics from Yale University in 2000 and a B.A. magna cum laude in economics from Princeton University.

EMILY SHELTON, PH.D. Student
Emily Shelton is a Ph.D. student in the University of Michigan Department of Health Management and Policy. She earned a B.A. from the University of Iowa and worked for 2 years in the health and human resources division at the Congressional Budget Office. Her research topics include the demand for medical care and health insurance, including labor market sorting and Medicare hospital reimbursement policy. Next year, she will advance to candidacy.

KOSALI SIMON, PH.D.
Kosali Simon is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Policy Analysis and Management at Cornell University, and a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research. Prior to her current position, she was an Assistant Professor in the Economics Department at Michigan State University. She received her Ph.D. in Economics from University of Maryland at College Park in 1999. Her research and teaching interests focus on policy oriented issues in health economics, labor economics and public finance.

KATHERINE SWARTZ, PH.D.
Prof. Swartz's current research interests focus on the population without health insurance and efforts to increase access to health care coverage, as well as health care financing and organization. She is finishing a book on the uninsured and how government-sponsored reinsurance could increase access to private health insurance coverage. The book is tentatively titled Reinsuring Health; it should be published by Spring 2006.

Prof. Swartz has been a member of the faculty in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Harvard School of Public Health since 1992. From 1982 to 1992, she was with the Urban Institute in Washington, D.C. In November 1995, Prof. Swartz became the editor of Inquiry, a journal that focuses on health care organization and financing. She was the 1991 recipient of the David Kershaw Award from the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management for research done before the age of 40 that has had a significant impact on public policy. She has a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Wisconsin and a BS in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

JESSICA VISTNES, PH.D.
Jessica Vistnes is a Senior Economist in the Center for Financing, Access and Cost Trends at the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Her research focuses on Employment-related health insurance coverage, the health insurance status of the U.S. population, the demand for Medigap insurance, and children's health care utilization. Her publications have appeared in Health Affairs, the Industrial and Labor Relations Review, Inquiry, the International Journal of Health Care Finance and Economics, the Journal of Human Resources, the National Tax Journal, Medical Care and Medical Care Research and Review. She joined AHRQ in 1989 after receiving a Ph.D. in Economics from Stanford University.

EBONYA WASHINGTON, PH.D.
Ebonya Washington is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Yale University. Her current research interests include public finance and political economy. Dr. Washington received her Ph.D. in Economics from MIT.